Tag Archives: events

Holiday Cookie Recipe Exchange

Have a favorite cookie recipe you’d like to share?  Drop it off at the library or email to mmoran@selco.info.

Looking for new cookie recipes to try?  Stop by starting on Monday, November 24 and pick up a copy of the recipes contributed.  We will also share here on the website.

Because you can never have too many Christmas cookies!  (Just don’t eat them all in one sitting.)

Halloween Party in a Bag

Come to the library on Friday, October 30 or Saturday, October 31 to get your party in a bag!  We’re sad that we won’t be able to offer our usual party, but instead, you can bring the fun home.  Packets will include coloring pages, activity sheets, a recipe, a craft, a prize or two and a bag of candy!  Choose pre-reader, reader or teen/tween.

Friday 1:00-6:00
Saturday 10:00-2:00

 

Virtual Storytimes

Hello storytimers!  We have missed you!  It’s not exactly the same, but Ms. Susan will be creating virtual storytime videos that will be shared on our Facebook page.  Each weekly episode will premiere Monday at 6:30, starting August 31st.   You don’t need a Facebook account to watch.

Our storytimes are designed for pre-schoolers, but feel free to watch at any age!

 

Summer Reading Program week five

Big thanks to Casey’s for the donation of 50 frozen treat coupons!  The first 50 kids to pick up their packets this week (starting Monday at noon) will get a free treat!

Our theme this week is everyday heroes.  It’s a good time to think about who you admire and how you can be a hero yourself.

Additional Resources:

Pre-readers:

Week five with Marguerite and Penny

Five Green and Speckled Frogs song

Readers:

Week five with Marguerite and Penny

Who Was book printable lesson plans and activity sheets

Teens and Tweens:

Week five with Marguerite and Penny

Want to add to your city?  Download more templates.  Build Your Own City challenges

 

Summer Reading Program Week Four

It’s week four!  This week our theme is royals and knights.  There are lots and lots of great books on that topic, so now’s a good time to check them out.

Additional Resources:

Pre-readers:

Week four with Marguerite and Penny

Here are some sing-along versions of this week’s songs:

Frere Jacques

Are You Sleeping, Brother John?

Mahurdeeysaa

Readers:

Week four with Marguerite and Penny

Fun Facts about Royals

Teens:

Week four with Marguerite and Penny

More marshmallow and toothpick building challenges

 

Summer Reading Program Week Three

Welcome to week three!  Can you believe we’re almost half-way done?  This week we’re doing some projects related to mythology and tall tales.  Do you have a favorite?

We do still have some week two packets.  Look in the box behind week three.

Additional Resources:

Pre-reader:

Week three with Marguerite and Penny

Want to give your Little Red Riding Hood some friends?
Little Red Riding Hood, wolf & woodcutter crafts

Hey Diddle Diddle song

The Itsy Bitsy Spider song

Reader:

Week three with Marguerite and Penny

Anansi the Spider book read aloud

Anansi the Spider old time animated video

There are lots of examples of gnome and fairy gardens online.  Here are a few tutorials that might be helpful if you decide to make one.

Gnome garden for kids video

How to make a fairy/gnome garden

13 fairy garden tips

Teen:

Week three with Marguerite and Penny

These aren’t exactly the same as our solar distiller project, but very close:

Solar distiller from large and small bottles

Solar distiller from a bottle and a can

Solar distiller from several bottles

 

 

Summer Reading Program 2020

Hello readers!  This year’s summer reading program is going to be different than the past, but we will be doing fun things, don’t worry!  We won’t have any big gatherings.  However, we will be producing online content and distributing packets with worksheets, crafts, coloring and other fun stuff every week!

FAQ:

How do we sign up?

You can call the library at 507-744-3977 starting on June 8th.  Or, if you prefer, sign up online here.  Please do register so we know how many kids are participating.

Will there be reading logs?

Yes.  We will include a reading log in your first weekly packet.  Or download a copy here.

reading log pre-reader

reading log readers

reading log teens

You can use this to keep track of your achievements.  However, the library will not be keeping track of your progress, so there’s no need to return the logs at any point.

Will we still be able to earn prizes?

Yes and no.  We won’t be giving out prizes based on how many tasks you complete.  The good news is, we will be distributing prizes in some of your weekly activity packets.  Everyone’s a winner!

Will you be having big events like the pizza party?

No.  We will not be doing any large gatherings this summer.

What about crafts and other activities?

Instead of gathering together to create crafts and work on other projects we will package up weekly kits with crafts, worksheets and other fun stuff arranged by age group.  You can pick up your kit at the library at a time that is convenient for you.  Please take only one packet per kid per week.  We encourage you to share your finished projects on our Facebook page.

What about craft supplies?

We will offer separate packets of crayons, glue sticks, and scissors that you can pick up anytime.  Crafts will include most of the items you will need.  A few projects may require some materials that hopefully you have at home (like flour or toilet paper rolls).

Which packet should I take?

There are three categories of packet and reading log: pre-readers, readers and teens.  We recommend pre-readers for 0-4, readers for 5-10 and teens for 11+.   This should help to assure that the materials are the appropriate level of interest and difficulty.

Will the library be open?

Yes, the library will be open for limited hours for browsing and pickup of materials and use of computers.  Social distancing will be in effect.

 

The Importance of Being Earnest discussion

Hello book group and others,

I hope you have had a chance to read The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde.  If not, you can get a free digital copy from Gutenberg.org.  Here are some discussion questions.  Feel free to discuss in the comments.  We also hope to have a virtual book group meeting.  If you are interested, please email lon_dir@selco.info.

Questions:

  1. Did you enjoy reading the play? Have you ever seen it performed in person or in a movie? What are the advantages and disadvantages to reading vs. viewing?
  2. Did the play make you laugh? Was there a particular incident or quote that really amused you?
  3. Why do both Jack and Algernon feel the need to invent Ernest and Bunbury? What do they gain?
  4. What does the aristocracy in Earnest value? How different (or not) are our values today than the Victorians?
  5. Lady Bracknell says, “Never speak disrespectfully of Society, Algernon. Only people who can’t get into it do that.” Is this statement true? Is it ironic that Lady Bracknell marries into society and quickly becomes its most vigorous defender?
  6. What’s up with all the food fights? Why are they humorous?
  7. Why are both Gwendolyn and Cecily so committed to the name Ernest? What does it have to do with their romantic idealizations?
  8. Do names really matter? Can you think of any examples from your life where a person’s name changed your opinion of them for better or worse?
  9. What is the importance of the city/country split? What qualities do city-dwellers usually have? How about country folks? Do these stereotypes work in Earnest?
  10. What do you think of the fight between Gwendolen and Cecily when they believe they are engaged to the same man? How do they say very harsh things within the limits of polite language? Do we still do this?
  11. Algy spends the play spouting outrageous statements. Do you think he means them or is he just playing the enfant terrible? To what extent is he a stand-in for author Oscar Wilde?
  12. Both couples are engaged after very little actual interaction. To what extent does each character create an imagined vision of their partner? Given that in the Victorian era matches were often arranged by the families and courting couples given very little scope to spend time together, are these engagements significantly different?
  13. “All women become like their mothers. That is their tragedy. No man does.  That’s his.”  Do you agree?
  14. Wilde uses several common literary devices, including mistaken identity, unlikely coincidence and the beloved happy ending. Are we meant to consider these ironically? Or is he simply giving us what we expect?

Characters:

John Worthing, J.P.
Algernon Moncrieff
Rev. Canon Chasuble, D.D.
Merriman, Butler
Lane, Manservant
Lady Bracknell
Hon. Gwendolen Fairfax
Cecily Cardew
Miss Prism, Governess