Tag Archives: books

New library app!

We’ve got a new app that will allow you to take the catalog with you wherever you go via a mobile app on your smartphone. The app makes it simple  to search for materials, place holds, manage your account and more.

The Lonsdale Public Library is part of the SELCO (Southeastern Libraries Cooperating) regional public library system, which spans 11 counties and includes 36 public libraries. SELCO worked with a developer to create the region-wide app that will function similarly to the desktop version of the catalog. Users will be able to search the regional catalog as well as their own library’s, manage their account, place holds, renew materials, download eBooks and eAudiobooks, and find libraries near them based on their location.

The app is free and available on the Apple App Store and Google Play store. You can find it by typing “SELCO Libraries” in the search bar. If you have questions or need help downloading the app, please contact the library for assistance.

Virtual Storytimes

Hello storytimers!  We have missed you!  It’s not exactly the same, but Ms. Susan will be creating virtual storytime videos that will be shared on our Facebook page.  Each weekly episode will premiere Monday at 6:30, starting August 31st.   You don’t need a Facebook account to watch.

Our storytimes are designed for pre-schoolers, but feel free to watch at any age!

 

Something for everyone!

Fun for kids

We’ve got some new activities in our window.  You can do them without coming into the library.  Just follow the arrows!

Jazz up your walk with this Lonsdale scavenger hunt.  You can pick up a physical copy in the library if you prefer.

Fun for grown-ups

Book Chats:

Your library staff loves recommending books.  We do it in person when we can, but since we’re seeing fewer of you and spending less time together when we do, we’ve decided to go digital.  We will take a few minutes to share a few titles that we love and why we recommend them.  The videos will be available on our YouTube channel and our Facebook page.  Up first, Marguerite talks psychological thrillers.

Because we can’t travel abroad, check out Get Your Guide for virtual tours and experiences.  There’s never been a better time to be an armchair traveler.

Family Fun:

Did you know there’s a drive-in theater just up the road in Elko New Market?  Check out the details on their website.

Take the kids camping in your backyard.  Make s’mores, tell ghost stories, listen to the birds.  You can even break out some scouting-style crafts like whittling, making lanyards,  or making leaf rubbings.  (Of course, not all activities are suitable for all ages.)

Want more ideas?  The Mayo Clinic has a list of safe outdoor activities.

Summer Reading Program Week Four

It’s week four!  This week our theme is royals and knights.  There are lots and lots of great books on that topic, so now’s a good time to check them out.

Additional Resources:

Pre-readers:

Week four with Marguerite and Penny

Here are some sing-along versions of this week’s songs:

Frere Jacques

Are You Sleeping, Brother John?

Mahurdeeysaa

Readers:

Week four with Marguerite and Penny

Fun Facts about Royals

Teens:

Week four with Marguerite and Penny

More marshmallow and toothpick building challenges

 

Summer Reading Program Reading List

We hope you are all enjoying Imagine Your Story.  If you’re looking for books of fairy tales, myths, talls tales, wizards, princesses and imagination, we hope you will appreciate this list by book type.  These are all books we have in our library.  Come in and check them out!

 

Board Books

Barton, Chris.  Shark vs. Train.

Bentley, Dawn.  Ten Tiny Fairies: A Fairy Tale Counting Book.

Brett, Jan.  The Mitten: A Ukrainian Folktale.

Runnells, Treesha.  Ten Wishing Stars.

Saltzberg, Barney.  Beautiful Oops!

Soman, David.  Ladybug Girl Dresses Up!

Wells, Rosemary.  The Itsy-Bitsy Spider.

 

Picture Books

Braun, Eric.  Pecos Bill Tames a Colossal Cyclone.

Brett, Jan.  Cinders: A Chicken Cinderella.

Bruchac, Joseph.  The First Strawberries: A Cherokee Story.

Burleigh, Robert.  Flight of the Last Dragon.

DePaola, Tomie.  Strega Nona: An Old Tale.

DiPucchio, Kelly.  Dragon Was Terrible.

Disney.  Walt Disney’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

Forest, Heather.  Stone Soup.

Garland, Michael.  Miss Smith’s Incredible Storybook.

Gay, Marie-Louise.  Any Questions?

Hoberman, Mary Ann.  Very Short Tall Tales To Read Together.

LaRochelle, David.  The End.

Long, Ethan.  One Drowsy Dragon.

Marshall, James.  Red Riding Hood.

McCourt, Lisa.  Granny’s Dragon.

Moncure, Jane Belk.  A Dragon in a Wagon.

Pichon, Liz.  The Three Horrid Little Pigs.

Prelutsky, Jack.  The Wizard.

Ray, Jane.  The Apple-Pip Princess.

Rubin, Adam.  Dragons Love Tacos.

Soman, David.  Ladyburg Girl and Bumblebee Boy.

Steptoe, John.  Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters: An African Tale.

Thomas, Shelley Moore.  Take Care, Good Knight.

Tolhurst, Marilyn.  Somebody and the Three Blairs.

Tucker, Kathy.  The Seven Chinese Sisters.

Underwood, Deborah.  Interstellar Cinderella.

Willems, Mo.  Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs.

 

Early Readers

Blackaby, Susan.  The Ugly Duckling.

Conlon, Mara.  Dragon’s Pancake Party.

Disney.  Welcome to Royal Prep. (Sofia the First)

George, K.  Spark.

Kilgras, Heidi.  Cinderella’s Countdown to the Ball.

Low, Alice.  The Witch Who Was Afraid of Witches.

Meadows, Daisy.  Pet Fairies series.

Neubecker,  Robert.  Days of the Knights.

Schwartz, Alvin.  Ghosts!: Ghostly Tales from Folklore.  J ER 398.25 S

Winkelman, Barbara Gaines.  Pinocchio’s Nose Grows.

 

Chapter Books

Baker, E.D.  The Frog Princess.

Barnhill, Kelly Regan.  The Girl Who Drank the Moon.

Colfer, Eoin.  Artemis Fowl series.

DiCamillo, Kate.  The Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread.

Ferris, Jean.  Twice Upon a Marigold.

French, Jackie.  My Dad the Dragon.

George, Jessica Day.  Dragon Slippers.

Hale, Shannon.  The Princess in Black.

Healy, Christopher.  The Hero’s Guide to Saving Your Kingdom.

Krulik, Nancy E.  Katie Kazoo, Switcheroo series.

Levine, Gail Carson.  Ella Enchanted.

Lewis, C.S.  The Chronicles of Narnia series.

Meadows, Daisy.  Jewel Fairies series.

Norton, Mary.  The Borrowers.

Osborne, Mary Pope.  Magic Tree House series.

Paolini, Christopher.  Eragon.

Riordan, Rick.  Percy Jackson & the Olympians series.

Rodda, Emily.  The Key to Rondo.

Ryder, Chloe.  Princess Ponies series.

Shulman, Polly.  The Grimm Legacy.

Sutherland, Tui.  Wings of Fire.

 

Juvenile Graphic Novels

Kibuishi, Kazui.  Amulet series.

O’Neill, Katie.  Princess Princess Ever After.

Ostertag, Molly.  The Witch Boy.

Powell, Martin.  The Elves and the Shoemaker: A Grimm Graphic Novel.

Sell, Chad.  The Cardboard Kingdom.

Sutherland, Tui.  Wings of Fire: The Graphic Novel series.

 

Young Adult

Adeyemi, Tomi.  Children of Blood and Bone.

Albert, Melissa.  The Hazel Wood.

Amerie.  Because You Love to Hate Me: 13 Tales of Villainy.

Cho, Kat.  Wicked Fox.

Delaney, Joseph.  Last Apprentice series.

De Lint, Charles.  The Blue Girl.

Froud, Brian.  Good Fairies: Bad Fairies.

Funke, Cornelia.  Inkheart.

Green, Sally.  Half Bad.

Hartman, Rachel.  Seraphina.

Meyer, Marissa.  Cinder.

Myers, Edward.  Storytelling.

Riggs, Ransom.  Tales of the Peculiar.

Van Risseghem, Kristin D.  The Masquerade, an Altar & a Fairy.

 

Juvenile Non-fiction

Finch, Mary.  The Three Billy Goats Gruff.  J 398.2 Fi.

Goble, Paul.  Buffalo Woman.  J 398.2 Go.

Hamilton, Sue.  Monsters.  J 001.94 Ha.

Kerns, Ann.  Wizards and Witches.  J 133.4 Ke

London, Martha.  Gnomes.  J 398.2 Lo.

Myths and Legends of North America: Canada and the Northern United States.  J 398.2 My

Resnick, Jane Parker.  Original Fairy Tales from the Brothers Grimm.  J 398.2 Re OVERSIZE.

Wizardology: The Book of the Secrets of Merlin.  J 133.4 Wi OVERSIZE.

Zelinsky, Paul O.  Rumpelstiltskin.   J 398.2 Ze.

 

 

Summer Reading Program 2020

Hello readers!  This year’s summer reading program is going to be different than the past, but we will be doing fun things, don’t worry!  We won’t have any big gatherings.  However, we will be producing online content and distributing packets with worksheets, crafts, coloring and other fun stuff every week!

FAQ:

How do we sign up?

You can call the library at 507-744-3977 starting on June 8th.  Or, if you prefer, sign up online here.  Please do register so we know how many kids are participating.

Will there be reading logs?

Yes.  We will include a reading log in your first weekly packet.  Or download a copy here.

reading log pre-reader

reading log readers

reading log teens

You can use this to keep track of your achievements.  However, the library will not be keeping track of your progress, so there’s no need to return the logs at any point.

Will we still be able to earn prizes?

Yes and no.  We won’t be giving out prizes based on how many tasks you complete.  The good news is, we will be distributing prizes in some of your weekly activity packets.  Everyone’s a winner!

Will you be having big events like the pizza party?

No.  We will not be doing any large gatherings this summer.

What about crafts and other activities?

Instead of gathering together to create crafts and work on other projects we will package up weekly kits with crafts, worksheets and other fun stuff arranged by age group.  You can pick up your kit at the library at a time that is convenient for you.  Please take only one packet per kid per week.  We encourage you to share your finished projects on our Facebook page.

What about craft supplies?

We will offer separate packets of crayons, glue sticks, and scissors that you can pick up anytime.  Crafts will include most of the items you will need.  A few projects may require some materials that hopefully you have at home (like flour or toilet paper rolls).

Which packet should I take?

There are three categories of packet and reading log: pre-readers, readers and teens.  We recommend pre-readers for 0-4, readers for 5-10 and teens for 11+.   This should help to assure that the materials are the appropriate level of interest and difficulty.

Will the library be open?

Yes, the library will be open for limited hours for browsing and pickup of materials and use of computers.  Social distancing will be in effect.

 

The Importance of Being Earnest discussion

Hello book group and others,

I hope you have had a chance to read The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde.  If not, you can get a free digital copy from Gutenberg.org.  Here are some discussion questions.  Feel free to discuss in the comments.  We also hope to have a virtual book group meeting.  If you are interested, please email lon_dir@selco.info.

Questions:

  1. Did you enjoy reading the play? Have you ever seen it performed in person or in a movie? What are the advantages and disadvantages to reading vs. viewing?
  2. Did the play make you laugh? Was there a particular incident or quote that really amused you?
  3. Why do both Jack and Algernon feel the need to invent Ernest and Bunbury? What do they gain?
  4. What does the aristocracy in Earnest value? How different (or not) are our values today than the Victorians?
  5. Lady Bracknell says, “Never speak disrespectfully of Society, Algernon. Only people who can’t get into it do that.” Is this statement true? Is it ironic that Lady Bracknell marries into society and quickly becomes its most vigorous defender?
  6. What’s up with all the food fights? Why are they humorous?
  7. Why are both Gwendolyn and Cecily so committed to the name Ernest? What does it have to do with their romantic idealizations?
  8. Do names really matter? Can you think of any examples from your life where a person’s name changed your opinion of them for better or worse?
  9. What is the importance of the city/country split? What qualities do city-dwellers usually have? How about country folks? Do these stereotypes work in Earnest?
  10. What do you think of the fight between Gwendolen and Cecily when they believe they are engaged to the same man? How do they say very harsh things within the limits of polite language? Do we still do this?
  11. Algy spends the play spouting outrageous statements. Do you think he means them or is he just playing the enfant terrible? To what extent is he a stand-in for author Oscar Wilde?
  12. Both couples are engaged after very little actual interaction. To what extent does each character create an imagined vision of their partner? Given that in the Victorian era matches were often arranged by the families and courting couples given very little scope to spend time together, are these engagements significantly different?
  13. “All women become like their mothers. That is their tragedy. No man does.  That’s his.”  Do you agree?
  14. Wilde uses several common literary devices, including mistaken identity, unlikely coincidence and the beloved happy ending. Are we meant to consider these ironically? Or is he simply giving us what we expect?

Characters:

John Worthing, J.P.
Algernon Moncrieff
Rev. Canon Chasuble, D.D.
Merriman, Butler
Lane, Manservant
Lady Bracknell
Hon. Gwendolen Fairfax
Cecily Cardew
Miss Prism, Governess

 

Curbside service!

Hello library community,

We miss your friendly faces, but we’re all doing the right thing by minimizing our contact.  That said, we believe that at this time we can begin to check out items via curbside service.  If you want to take part, here’s how:

  • Our regular online request process remains in place. Please note that items requested online will not be immediately available, and some items may not be available at all.
  • We will also accept requests by phone during pickups hours only. Note that we will need at least 15 minutes to process requests.
  • You will choose your pickup time during pickup hours and we will check out materials to you, print a receipt, package your checked-out items, and leave them in the entryway with your initials attached. Please retrieve materials promptly.  You must make an appointment ahead of time.

Pickup hours

Monday, Wednesday-Friday     1-5
Tuesday      3-7
Saturday     11-1

We will take all reasonable precautions, but you should exercise your own judgment.   

FAQs:

Q: Can I come in to the library to select my items?
A: No, the library building past the entryway remains closed.  Library staff will check out items to you and leave them in the lobby at the time of your pickup appointment.

Q: I’m not sure of the exact titles I want.  Can you help?
A: Yes, we would be glad to help you find something you will enjoy during our phone conversation.

Q: What are you doing to prevent the spread of COVID-19 on materials?
A: We are using gloves, washing our hands regularly, and holding returned items for 24 hours before they can be checked out again.  If you are still concerned, we recommend holding items for 24-72 hours before opening them.  Please do not use cleaners on library materials as they may cause damage.

Q: What if I want to keep the items I have checked out until the library reopens?
A: That’s just fine.  Due dates have been automatically extended, and if you end up with late fees accrued during this period, we will gladly waive them.

Q: What if I set up an appointment and then miss it?
A: We will hold your materials for up to 10 days in the library, but you will need to make a new pick up appointment.

If you have more questions, please call us during pickup hours at 507-744-3977 or send an email to lon_dir@selco.info.

Virtual Book Group

As you may know, our library has a book group for grownups.  We usually meet on the third Wednesday of each month.  Since that’s not possible right now, let’s meet online!  You don’t have to already be a member to join in.

Since we can’t order copies of the book while libraries are closed, we will read something available online for free.  Let’s lighten our mood with the classic comedy The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde.  You can download a copy for free from Project Gutenberg.  https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/844

Get a start reading and we’ll post discussion questions soon.  Take care, friends.